Nelson and Beyond!

Sheep (very plentiful on the South Isl) and Nelson in the background

Sheep (very plentiful on the South Isl) and Nelson in the background

I’ve been offline for a few weeks because I was off galavanting in the bushier areas of northern South Island. We spent a few days hanging out in Nelson, which is a very cool little city.

Nelson gets brownie points for it's cool recycling bins!

Nelson gets brownie points for it's cool recycling bins!

Nelson also claims the “Centre of New Zealand”, which is a small plaque on top of a big hill that marks the exact middle of the country.

centre pics

Ba-ha-ha-ha

Ba-ha-ha-ha

After a few days in Nelson, I headed north-west-ish to the ity bity town of Tasman. Situated right on the estuary of Tasman Bay, the town boasts a corner store, and one gas pump. I think it is or used to be where the apple packaging facility was for the surrounding orchards. They also host a Kiwi Bird the size of a Grizzlar. Don’t worry, he’s not some mutant form of the reclusive bird, but a wooden sculpture. It seems that every small town in New Zealand has a claim to fame. Manaia is the “Bread Capitol of New Zealand” – home of the largest bakery in the country. All the bread went to Subway so you couldn’t buy a ‘tourist’ loaf, but to make up for it there is always the photo op under the massive loaf of bread that welcomes you to town. I believe this Kiwi bird serves a similar purpose, but the bus driver wouldn’t stop for us.

Manaias Bread Loaf, photocredit: TreMichLan on Flickr

Manaia's Bread Loaf, photocredit: TreMichLan on Flickr

This poor girl was being eaten by the crazy large kiwi, photocredit: melissa on picasa

This poor girl was being eaten by the crazy large kiwi, photocredit: melissa on picasa

What would take me to Tasman Home of the Biggest Kiwi Bird? WWOOFing. I spent a week wwoofing on a property just above the estuary, and perched on a cliff overlooking Tasman Bay. The woman who owned the property bought it 25 years ago, and has been slowly building it up and growing an organic orchard and veggie patches. The property was gorgeous, and we were lucky enough to have fantastic weather. There were two other wwoofers staying there as well – and English bloke and and Aussie girl – very nice folk! It was a lot more fun weeding with friends around.

View of Tasman Bay from the strawberry patch

View of Tasman Bay from the strawberry patch

Wind and solar power took a big chunk out of the home electricity bills!

Wind and solar power took a big chunk out of the home electricity bills!

I couldn't help but spend some quality time with the chickens

I couldn't help but spend some quality time with the chickens

Baby goats are the cutest creatures ever!!

Baby goats are the cutest creatures ever!!

Conquering the Abel Tasman

After WWOOFing, I headed out for the Abel Tasman Great Walk. The Department of Conservation (DOC) has created eight or nine Great Walks across the country that are easy to access, and well maintained in an effort to make the ‘wilderness’ more accessible. All the great walks have hut accommodation available, so you don’t hav to camp. This was great for me because I wasn’t particularly interested in buying a tent or carrying it for five days.

Map of the Abel Tasman walk

Map of the Abel Tasman walk

From end to end the track is about 55Km, but I think I ended up doing closer to 70Km because we took a few side trails and looped back in the end to catch a water taxi.

I met up with an English guy, Bruce, for the hike. The first day of the track followed the coastline closely and dipped down on to beautiful golden sand beaches. The coastline is all granite rock, and iron oxide (rust) tints the beaches golden. The water ranged from an incredible turquoise blue to deep green.

The walk started on a boardwalk through the Marahau estuary

The walk started on a boardwalk through the Marahau estuary

One of many gorgeous beaches along the walk

One of many gorgeous beaches along the walk

Adele Island

Adele Island

The first night we stayed at the Anchorage Hut. I guess I’ve been away from Canada too long because when I saw the crystal clear and turquoise water in Anchorage Bay, I didn’t think, “pretty, but glacier cold.” I thought, “a refreshing dip in the ocean would be so nice after a long day of hiking.”  SOOO cold!! Take your breath away cold!! It was definitely invigorating, and luckily the sun was out to warm  me up when I got out of the water.

Care for a dip?! Brrrrr!

Care for a dip?! Brrrrr!

Sunset at Anchorage Bay

Sunset at Anchorage Bay

Ahhh... warm sun!

Ahhh... warm sun!

The next morning we had a tidal crossing first thing. We had hoped we wouldn’t have to get our feet wet, but in the end the boots had to come off. From there we hiked up to some pretty water falls, and even got to cross a suspension bridge over Falls River.

Tidal crossing at Anchorage Bay

Tidal crossing at Anchorage Bay

I wanted to go for a boat ride, but figured my pack would sink the boat

I wanted to go for a boat ride, but figured my pack would sink the boat

The water in Falls River was crystal clear

The water in Falls River was crystal clear

Me on the suspention bridge

Me on the suspention bridge

Bark Bay was the destination that evening. More beautiful beaches and turquoise water!

There is a penguin hide out near here

There is a penguin hide out near here

The next morning it had already started to drizzle as we left the hut, but we hoped that it would hold out for a few hours.

Along the Bark Bay estuary... a litte cloudier today

Along the Bark Bay estuary... a litte cloudier today

It didn’t. By the time we got to Onetahuti Bay it was pouring. We braved a big jump to get across the tidal crossing at this beach. At this point my feet were already wet so it didn’t really matter that they got a little soggier when I missed the bank. Ooops!

By the time we reached the Awaroa Hut we were both soaked to the bone. I had my camera wrapped up in a plastic bag in my jacket pocket, but either the bag or my jacket leaked because the camera ended up having a bath. Luckily I’ve dried it out now, and it works most of the time!

When we got into the Awaroa Hut there were a couple of guys standing in their boxers by the fireplace trying to dry off and warm up. After a while they started to put all the gear back on, and said they were headed to Anchorage Bay… over 20Km and two tidal crossings away. I have no idea what time they ended up getting to Anchorage, but I know they made it because I saw them walking around Christchurch yesterday. The funniest part was that they had all their gear and jackets back on when we realized they still weren’t wearing any pants. When we jokingly told them not to forget about that vital piece of clothing, they shrugged and said there was no point in wearing pants because they would just get wet. Yes, they had extra dry clothes to change into, so they didn’t have to worry if one pair got wet. I suppose they just wanted to be able to say they walked the Abel Tasman in two day without pants on.

The next morning, the sun broke through again! I turned my camera on and blindly took a picture – at that point the screen wasn’t working and I wasn’t sure if it would ever work again. I got a good shot of the estuary though!

Awora crossing at high tide

Awora crossing at high tide. You can just make out the orange marker on the other side

Low tide wasn’t until 1:30pm, so I had to wait until 12:30pm to set off across the inlet. Despite it being in the ‘safe zone’ to cross, the water in some of the channels still came up to mid-thigh.

Hiking through Anapai Bay and Mutton Cove was beautiful, but walking on the beach is also very tiring. The seal colony at Separation Point wasn’t very populated, and they didn’t care much for my attempts at seal barking. I suppose I’ve got the wrong accent down here.

The next day back tracked 7.5Km to Totaranui, where I caught a water taxi back to Marahau. The water taxi ride was lots of fun, and the driver was an excellent tour guide. I was the only one on the boat all the way to Anchoarge Bay, so he took me over to the Tonga Island seal colony, showed me where the Blue Penguins come ashore at night, and shared a few Maori legends of the area. I even spotted two penguins swimming!!

The water taxi got pulled out of the water by tractor once we got to Marahau, and then you ride in the boat all the way back to the main road. photocredit: Abel Tasman Centre

The water taxi got pulled out of the water by tractor once we got to Marahau, and then you ride in the boat all the way back to the main road. photocredit: Abel Tasman Centre

That night I made it back to Nelson, Miranda and I left for Christchurch the next morning.

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4 Comments

Filed under Travel

4 responses to “Nelson and Beyond!

  1. Auntie Deb

    Hey Em
    We all missed you at Thanksgiving. I always look forward to reading your latest blog. Have to say that your Great Grandpa Jub. would be having a big smile if he knew you were working on a dairy farm, gotta say the overalls were exactly what I remember him weariing. Your latest walk about looked absolutely beautiful, take care, love Auntie Deb

  2. dad

    sound like the adventure is continuing nicely. seems going pantless is a common theme lately- global warming? we were shooting 1/2 way up the mountain at britannia beach yesterday. we arrived in the morning pre-dawn, the usual cluster fuck of crew, trucks, narrow road and confusion, when out of the bush walks this guy a his dog. the guy was wearing his hiking boots, shirt & coat, but nothing in between- should have opted for a longer coat. why he was carrying his pants was a topic of speculation for the rest of the day.
    oh well, carry on down there.
    love dad

  3. pam

    hey em! love reading your updates – that hike reminds me of the west coast trail… i remember you exploring the tide-pools still sleepy and fresh from your …..
    missing you,
    pam

  4. pam

    hi emily – i love your updates – this one reminds me of the west coast trail trip!
    miss you!
    p

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