The Great Ocean Road

Very important.

Very important.

Adelaide

I left the hot sun of Mission Beach for the much cooler climate of Adelaide sometime last week. It was a bit of a shock getting off the plane and piling on layers and layers of clothes for the first time in about two months. I have to admit the fresh breeze and misting rain felt really good.

Adelaide is a nice place – had a small town feel, and the city is nothing like Sydney or Melbourne in scale. Sort of like Victoria versus Vancouver. I didn’t have much time in Adelaide because I was booked for a Groovy Grape Tour of the Great Ocean Road from Adelaide to Melbourne. When Miranda was visiting Melbourne in July she said the Great Ocean Road was  a “must do!” However, while I was in Adelaide I did manage to find a little farmer’s market with excellent hot chocolate, and had some nice walks along the river.

Chilies and coco... yummmy

Chilies and cocoa (or maybe coffee)... yummmy

Grampians National Park

The tour group was small, but very diverse. We had people from: Ireland, England, Germany (only one!!), Iraq, South Korea, China, Wales, Mexico, Australia, Canada, USA, and Japan. We drove (and slept) a lot on the first day because we had to get a ways out of Adelaide before reaching the Grampians National Park. First stop was Mackenzie falls – very pretty! There were rocks in the pool below the waterfall that you could use to get to the other side, which was pretty cool.

Me with a little bit of Mackenize Falls in the background

Me with a little bit of Mackenize Falls in the background

We stayed in a cute little mountain town that had lots of kangaroos! There are two types of ‘roos in the area – Western Greys and Eastern Greys. Named just to confuse you because the Western Greys are brown not at all grey.

Pop Quiz! Are Mama and Joey Eastern Greys or Western Greys?

Pop Quiz! Are Mama and Joey Eastern Greys or Western Greys?

————

Another Geek Moment brought to you by Embalism:

About 430 million years ago (MYA) the Grampians area was a seabed that was lifted up by tectonic processes. As it had been a sea bed, it was sedimentary rock – lots of layers piled up on top of each other. Personally, I only find geology really interesting when you can clearly see the results of these large scale process and time scales… otherwise it’s somehow hard to find context for it all. Anyways, the Grampians are super cool because you can actually SEE where the seabed was lifted because in large areas there is no forest – just big slabs of mountain laying at an angle, and clearly layered. I found this super exciting and took lots of pictures; very few of which actually do the sight justice.

Can you see the angle the rocks are at... ?

Can you see the angle the rocks are at... ?

On a smaller scale, we also found some fossils! They’re the burrow holes of little crabs… no trilobites, but still cool.

A crab dug those slightly discoloured lumpy vertical bumps in the sand over 430MYA

A crab dug those slightly discoloured lumpy vertical bumps in the sand over 430MYA

Thank-you, and we hope you enjoyed this Geek Moment.

——-

The Great Ocean Road

Best seen and not read.

The Great Ocean Road begins!

The Great Ocean Road begins!

The Bay of Islands - lots of huge waves today!

The Bay of Islands - lots of huge waves today!

London Bridge - The bridge used to be connected by two arches, but sometime in the last decade the left arch crumbled into the sea! Eventually it will happen to the other side too, and the stack in the middle will remain (like the 12 Apostles)

London Bridge - The bridge used to be connected by two arches, but sometime in the last decade the left arch crumbled into the sea! Eventually it will happen to the other side too, and the stack in the middle will remain (like the 12 Apostles)

Next stop - Loch Ard Gorge, named after the ship that sunk here

Next stop - Loch Ard Gorge, named after the ship that sunk here

The famous 12 Apostles. You can try REALLY hard to see all 12 from here, but it's impossible. Some are hidden, and some don't exist anymore. Eventually the waves and erosion get too much for these stacks to stand.

The famous 12 Apostles. You can try REALLY hard to see all 12 from here, but it's impossible. Some are hidden, and some don't exist anymore. Eventually the waves and erosion get too much for these stacks to stand.

Bells Beach! Home of Rip Curl. The waves were tiny today, but you can still see some surfers out on the point.

Bells Beach! Home of Rip Curl and Quicksilver. The waves were tiny today, but you can still see some surfers out on the point.

Sweet dude! :)

I wish we'd had time to stop for a surf!

Oh! Koalas awake, low in a tree, and just waiting to greet us!! Mama and baby were just chillin'.

Oh! Koalas awake, low in a tree, and just waiting to greet us!! Mama and baby were just chillin'.

The wind picked up a bit, and the litte guy snuggled back into Mama's pouch. SO CUTE!!

The wind picked up a bit, and the litte guy snuggled back into Mama's pouch. SO CUTE!!

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Travel

2 responses to “The Great Ocean Road

  1. Karyn

    Eli enjoyed the geology lesson with visual aids. No, really! I think he’s got more questions for you later … also about magnetism.
    We just got back from ON – went to the Rock & Mineral exhibit at the ROM (his fave), also visited some defunct mine sites near Cobalt.

  2. There’s good info here. I did a search on the topic and found most people will agree with your blog. Keep up the good work mate!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s